HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

christmas-1964-living-room

This is going to be another one of those posts of pure coincidence — this time I’m not talking about a piece that I inherited from my grandparents — instead how funny it is that history repeats itself. Case in point — I didn’t see the above photo from 1964 of my Mom, Nana and Uncle (and sleeping dog in lower right corner) for the first time until about two years ago. That was about four years after I bought a chair that looks quite similar to the round chair in the upper left hand corner of this photo. But mine is orange — and my Nana’s was surely not also orange — right?

Orange-chair-from-1970

Wrong! The chair in question makes another appearance in 1970 — this time in color — proving that yes, even though I had no idea that Nana and Bob had a round orange chair that disappeared many years before I was born — I seemed to have gravitated to a very similar chair for my own house.

orangechairandtable

They aren’t twins, but surely must be related.

living-room-1965

If further proof that history repeats itself is needed — here’s another example. The wooden end table in the photo of above of my Nana and her brother (the table also appears in the photo of the orange chair) is very similar to the mid century end table that is currently for sale at West Elm.

west-elm-mid-century-nightstand

When I saw the table in question for the first time I remarked how cool it was (for new furniture) to my Mom — who told me that it looks just like the ones that her Dad made back in the 1960s.

So there you have it folks. History repeats itself!

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

    • I bought it on Ebay about 5 years ago. There is a tag that says β€œcopyright 1967 β€” by Gamma Associates INC” on the underside of the table top. I’m pretty sure I got it from a seller in Michigan. (maybe they were made there?)

  1. Nana’s orange chair was a swivel and ended up in the room with a turquoise Danish modern type sofa …. complementary colors of sorts that we continue to gravitate towards. Guess design tendencies are passed down through the generations. πŸ™‚ Even my dog, Daisy, was a border collie mix … does that sound familiar too??? She of the tan and white persuasion, not the typical black and white type. Still a smart and personable dog and great companion like your Leo. Fun to see the old photos. I still have some of the glass ball weights and cork floats that are hanging on the fishing net and the large abalone shell and large starfish named “Sam.” πŸ™‚

    • I was guessing Nana’s orange chair had a swivel…mine doesn’t 😦 looks like the legs on hers were metal, mine are wood — but still — a very close match!

      Yes — even choice in dogs seems to be hereditary! Jim’s parents have had several border collie mix dogs too.

      Also, I do remember “sam” the starfish…Nana had it in her window ledge in Mississippi with some of those glass weights and bottles covered with barnacles…I remember!

      • The net, glass balls and sealife take me back to a family trip to Cape Cod in the late 50s. My Mom picked up similar items and festooned our large kitchen window with a swag of net and glass ball weights. Looked great with the sun shining through. To me, that ocean-themed kitsch feels like a cousin to tiki.

  2. I am pretty sure my husband had the same sweater as your uncle, so I will have to look for a picture of my husband’s.

    • It doesn’t have any tags on it and I bought it at a yard sale a few years ago. The sellers didn’t know anything about it either — since they also bought it at a yard sale. I suppose if I ever get rid of it, I’ll have to sell it at a yard sale too! πŸ˜‰

  3. What I like most about these original photos is seeing how eclectic folks actually were. People probably rarely went out and bought a whole room full of atomic furniture. It all seems more real.

    • Good point Larry. Nana and Bob did have an eclectic collection of furniture — some of it was passed down from their parents, some Bob made and some they bought, but rarely all at the same time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s